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Home Schooling Resources for WV Public Libraries   Tags: education, home schoolers, home schooling, library services  

Information and ideas for public librarians, parent and students regarding Home Schooling options and information specific to West Virginia.
Last Updated: Nov 17, 2016 URL: http://wvlcguides.org/content.php?pid=420325 Print Guide RSS Updates
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Home Schooling Books Available at WVLC

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The Librarian's Guide to Homeschooling Resources - Susan G. Scheps
ISBN: 0838907377
Publication Date: 1998-06-01

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Guerrilla Learning - Grace Llewellyn; Amy Silver
ISBN: 9780471349600
Publication Date: 2001-08-20

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Family Matters - David Guterson
ISBN: 0156300001
Publication Date: 1993-09-16

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The Homeschooling Option - Lisa Rivero
ISBN: 0230600700
Publication Date: 2007-12-15

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How to Protect Your Challenged Child - Margaret C. Jasper
ISBN: 037911397X
Publication Date: 2004-12-21

 

Articles on Library Services to Home Schoolers

If an article you want does not have an HTLM or PDF file attached, send an email to the Library Commission to InterLibrary Loan it.

Welcoming Homeschoolers to the Library. - Blaine^Hilyard, Nann1 nbhilyard@zblibrary.org
Publication Date: May/Jun2008
Abstract: The article discusses the various services offered by
the public library for homeschooling families in the U.S. It includes the partnership of the Cleveland Public Library (CPL) with Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) to publicize materials of interest to homeschoolers with a quarterly booklist of new acquisitions. Another is the development of the Home Learning Center in Illinois which provides homeschooling families a range of several school-related materials. In Baltimore, Maryland, homeschooling technology classes are held at the Enoch Pratt Library's Orleans Street Branch at the Pratt
Center for Technology Training

Don't Tell the Children: Homeschoolers' Best-Kept Secret - Early, Sherry
Publication Date: Horn Book Magazine; Sep/Oct2008
The author discusses how homeschooled children feel about reading. It is suggested that homeschooled children learn from an early age to read for information, not just for enjoyment. The author explains that she likes to read what her children are reading, not because she is monitoring what is being read, but because she enjoys the books.

A community connection: The public library and home schoolers. - Wikel, Nancy
Publication Date: Emergency Librarian; Jan/Feb95
Discusses the relation between home schooling and public libraries. Reasons for home schooling; Teaching styles parents use in home schooling; Home schooler's use of public libraries; Services offered by public libraries to home schoolers.

An educated collection for homeschoolers. - Klipsch, Pamela R.
Publication Date: Library Journal; 2/1/1995
Suggests titles for creating a library collection to meet the needs of homeschooling families. Categories, including theory and research, legal guidance, curricula design and evaluation, personal experiences and more; `Is Public Education Necessary?,' by Samuel L. Blumenfeld; The periodical `The Teaching Home,' edited by R. Sue Welch; `The Home School Manual: Plans, Pointers, Reasons and Resources for Parents Who Teach Their Own Children,' by Theodore E. Wade and others.

A Home Away from Home - Shinn, Lora
Publication Date: School Library Journal; Aug2008
The article focuses on public library outreach to homeschooling families. It suggests creating a page containing homeschooling information as part of the library's Web site, offering library tours to homeschooling groups, and offering to provide topical collections of library resources upon request. Creating programs targeted to homeschoolers, developing volunteer opportunities for homeschooling families, and hosting homeschooling fairs are also discussed.

FABLE AND FACT: SERVING THE HOMESCHOOL POPULATION IN PUBLIC LIBRARIES. - Marquam, Tamara
Publication Date: Indiana Libraries; 2008
The article outlines the importance of libraries to homeschoolers in the U.S. As homeschooling is becoming popular in the country, the need to use libraries also increases because the facility offers various usage including a meeting place, a resource for learning and research, a cultural resource that provides programming and materials and a recreational reading resource. Many families prefer homeschooling because it meets the special needs or learning styles of their children, enjoyed the flexibility of the schedule for those who travel, dissatisfaction with state/government regulations at school and provide individualized teaching.

Homeschooling: "Exploring the Potential of Public Library Service for Homeschooled Students". - Baaden, Bea
Publication Date: Journal of the Library Administration & Management Section; Mar2009
As the number of homeschooled students rises in this country, needs for resources, instruction and support also has risen. The homeschooled students, while not participating in the school classrooms and by extension the school or public libraries, have needs that should be satisfied by library services. These include access to materials and technology, information literacy skills instruction, reading and writing support, curriculum materials and methods, reference services, as well as areas to "make and take", facilities for quiet study or to meet with mentors or tutors. In addition, homeschooled students need the kind of library skills instruction that all students in traditional school libraries receive. The purpose of this study is to identify the strengths and weaknesses of library support to home-schooled students in Nassau-Suffolk, Long Island and to make recommendations based upon analysis. The major question examined is: How are homeschooled students served through their local public libraries? Also the study examines the perception of homeschooling families by public librarians. There are three main conclusions that derive from the study: the librarians' reactive rather than proactive response to the homeschooled population; the lack of consistent leadership in development or outreach of library programs specifically for the homeschooled; and the public librarians' perception that there is no difference between the homeschooled population and the rest of the patrons who use the library. The analysis leads to suggestions and recommendations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

WHAT LIBRARIANS NEED TO KNOW. - Riegle-Course, Ann
Publication Date: Ohio Libraries; Spring2004
A common assumption is that families choose to home school because of religious convictions. Returning to statistics gathered in 1999 by the federal government and studied by John Cloud, 75% of those polled actually began home schooling because they were worried about the quality of their children's education. Being able to include religious and moral issues in the curriculum is a secondary benefit for many families. The surveyed families support these claims. Two of the three families interviewed began home schooling so they could better monitor and meet the specific or special needs of their children. One family started home schooling with one child, and after experiencing successful results, decided to home school all three children. Because many home school families have a limited income many are one income families with one parent who stays at home to home school, public library technology resources and access to the Internet are very popular with home schoolers. One family that was interviewed has a computer at home, but they find one computer is not enough for three children

Libraries and Homeschoolers. - Willingham, Theresa
Publication Date: Knowledge Quest; Sep/Oct2008
The article focuses on the aspects of libraries and homeschooling in the U.S. It says that the term "homeschooling" immediately sets the stage for something different, and goes beyond the implied features of an informal home setting. It notes that homeschool families typically connect with one another at the community level with homeschool support groups like informal playgroups and learning cooperatives. Homeschool libraries can be huge with overflowing affairs of popular learning books

 

WV State Code 18-8-1: Home Schooling

§18-8-1. Compulsory school attendance; exemptions.
(a) Exemption from the requirements of compulsory public school attendance established in section one-a of this article shall be made on behalf of any child for the causes or conditions set forth in this section. Each cause or condition set forth in this section is subject to confirmation by the attendance authority of the county.

(b) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of this subsection, relating to instruction in a private, parochial or other approved school, are met. The instruction shall be in a school approved by the county board and for a time equal to the instructional term set forth in section forty-five, article five of this chapter. In all private, parochial or other schools approved pursuant to this subsection it is the duty of the principal or other person in control, upon the request of the county superintendent, to furnish to the county board such information and records as may be required with respect to attendance, instruction and progress of students enrolled.

(c) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of either subdivision (1) or subdivision (2) of this subsection, both relating to home instruction, are met.

(1) The instruction shall be in the home of the child or children or at some other place approved by the county board and for a time equal to the instructional term set forth in section forty-five, article five of this chapter. If the request for home instruction is denied by the county board, good and reasonable justification for the denial shall be furnished in writing to the applicant by the county board. The instruction shall be conducted by a person or persons who, in the judgment of the county superintendent and county board, are qualified to give instruction in subjects required to be taught in public elementary schools in the state. The person or persons providing the instruction, upon request of the county superintendent, shall furnish to the county board information and records as may be required periodically with respect to attendance, instruction and progress of students receiving the instruction. The state board shall develop guidelines for the home schooling of special education students including alternative assessment measures to assure that satisfactory academic progress is achieved.

(2) The child meets the requirements set forth in this subdivision: Provided,That the county superintendent may seek from the circuit court of the county an order denying home instruction of the child. The order may be granted upon a showing of clear and convincing evidence that the child will suffer neglect in his or her education or that there are other compelling reasons to deny home instruction.

(A) Annually, the person or persons providing home instruction shall present to the county superintendent or county board a notice of intent to provide home instruction and the name, address, age and grade level of any child of compulsory school age to be instructed: Provided,That if a child is enrolled in a public school, notice of intent to provide home instruction shall be given at least two weeks prior to withdrawing the child from public school;

(B) The person or persons providing home instruction shall submit satisfactory evidence of a high school diploma or equivalent;

(C) The person or persons providing home instruction shall outline a plan of instruction for the ensuing school year; and

(D) On or before June 30 annually, the person or persons providing home instruction shall obtain an academic assessment of the child for the previous school year and submit the results to the county superintendent. When the academic assessment takes place outside of a public school, the parent or legal guardian shall pay the cost. The requirement of an academic assessment is satisfied in one of the following ways:

(i) The child receiving home instruction takes a nationally normed standardized achievement test to be administered under standardized conditions as set forth by the published instructions of the selected test in the subjects of reading, language, mathematics, science and social studies. The child's parent or legal guardian may not administer the test in any event. The publication date of the chosen test may not be more than ten years from the date the test is administered. The child is considered to have made acceptable progress when the mean of the child's test results in the required subject areas for any single year meets or exceeds the fiftieth percentile or, if below the fiftieth percentile, shows improvement from the previous year's results;

(ii) The child participates in the testing program currently in use in the state's public schools. The test shall be administered to the child at a public school in the county of residence. Determination of acceptable progress shall be based on current guidelines of the state testing program;

(iii) The county superintendent is provided with a written narrative indicating that a portfolio of samples of the child's work has been reviewed and that the child's academic progress for the year is in accordance with the child's abilities. If the narrative indicates that the child's academic progress for the year is in accordance with the child's abilities, the child is considered to have made acceptable progress. This narrative shall be prepared by a certified teacher whose certification number shall be provided. The narrative shall include a statement about the child's progress in the areas of reading, language, mathematics, science and social studies and shall note any areas which, in the professional opinion of the reviewer, show need for improvement or remediation; or

(iv) The child completes an alternative academic assessment of proficiency that is mutually agreed upon by the parent or legal guardian and the county superintendent. Criteria for acceptable progress shall be mutually agreed upon by the same parties; and

(E) When the annual assessment fails to show acceptable progress as defined under the appropriate assessment option set forth in paragraph (D) of this subdivision, the person or persons providing home instruction shall initiate a remedial program to foster acceptable progress. The county board shall notify the parents or legal guardian of the child, in writing, of the services available to assist in the assessment of the child's eligibility for special education services. Identification of a disability does not preclude the continuation of home schooling. In the event that the child does not achieve acceptable progress as defined under the appropriate assessment option set forth in paragraph (D) of this subdivision for a second consecutive year, the person or persons providing instruction shall submit to the county superintendent additional evidence that appropriate instruction is being provided.

(3) This subdivision applies to both home instruction exemptions set forth in subdivisions (1) and (2) of this subsection. The county superintendent or a designee shall offer such assistance, including textbooks, other teaching materials and available resources, all subject to availability, as may assist the person or persons providing home instruction. Any child receiving home instruction may upon approval of the county board exercise the option to attend any class offered by the county board as the person or persons providing home instruction may consider appropriate subject to normal registration and attendance requirements.

(d) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of this subsection, relating to physical or mental incapacity, are met. Physical or mental incapacity consists of incapacity for school attendance and the performance of school work. In all cases of prolonged absence from school due to incapacity of the child to attend, the written statement of a licensed physician or authorized school nurse is required. Incapacity shall be narrowly defined and in any case the provisions of this article may not allow for the exclusion of the mentally, physically, emotionally or behaviorally handicapped child otherwise entitled to a free appropriate education.

(e) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if conditions rendering school attendance impossible or hazardous to the life, health or safety of the child exist.

(f) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article upon regular graduation from a standard senior high school or alternate secondary program completion as determined by the state board.

(g) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the child is granted a work permit pursuant to the subsection. After due investigation the county superintendent may grant work permits to youths under the termination age designated in section one-a of this article, subject to state and federal labor laws and regulations. A work permit may not be granted on behalf of any youth who has not completed the eighth grade of school.

(h) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if a serious illness or death in the immediate family of the child has occurred. It is expected that the county attendance director will ascertain the facts in all cases of such absences about which information is inadequate and report the facts to the county superintendent.

(i) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of this subsection, relating to destitution in the home, are met. Exemption based on a condition of extreme destitution in the home may be granted only upon the written recommendation of the county attendance director to the county superintendent following careful investigation of the case. A copy of the report confirming the condition and school exemption shall be placed with the county director of public assistance. This enactment contemplates every reasonable effort that may properly be taken on the part of both school and public assistance authorities for the relief of home conditions officially recognized as being so destitute as to deprive children of the privilege of school attendance. Exemption for this cause is not allowed when the destitution is relieved through public or private means.

(j) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of this subsection, relating to church ordinances and observances of regular church ordinances, are met. The county board may approve exemption for religious instruction upon written request of the person having legal or actual charge of a child or children. This exemption is subject to the rules prescribed by the county superintendent and approved by the county board.

(k) A child is exempt from the compulsory school attendance requirement set forth in section one-a of this article if the requirements of this subsection, relating to alternative private, parochial, church or religious school instruction, are met. Exemption shall be made for any child attending any private school, parochial school, church school, school operated by a religious order or other nonpublic school which elects to comply with the provisions of article twenty-eight of this chapter.

(l) Completion of the eighth grade does not exempt any child under the termination age designated in section one-a of this article from the compulsory attendance provision of this article.

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Lisa Hechesky, Research Librarian
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WV Library Commission
1900 Kanawha Blvd. E.,
Culture Center
Charleston, WV 25305

Phone: (304) 558-2045
Fax: (304) 558-2044
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